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Judge recuses self from murder case
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Judge recuses self from murder case




After waiting 37 years for a hearing Charles Ray Finch hoped would set him free, Thursday’s court proceedings came to an abrupt halt. And Finch is still waiting.

A Wilson County judge recused himself from an evidentiary hearing in the murder conviction of Finch.

The decision came after Finch’s attorney began to question a former Federal Bureau of Investigation agent who was a lead investigator into the Wilson County Sheriff’s Office corruption case in the 1970s.

Superior Court Judge Milton F. Fitch Jr. represented several people during that time period in connection with the federal case and grand jury proceedings, he said. Fitch told the court that it wouldn’t be appropriate for him to oversee the hearing after having peripheral involvement in representing those at the time.

"In the interest of justice, I was close enough to the matters ...,” Fitch said Thursday. He also said it was in the best interest of the court for him to remove himself and that he didn’t even want the "appearance of impropriety.”

"I made this disclosure on my own,” Fitch told the court. In an evidentiary hearing, a judge rules on the matters based on the evidence presented.

"This is where I stand,” he told lawyers about his decision.

This hearing began Wednesday in the murder conviction of Finch, who is currently serving a life sentence in the killing of Richard "Shadow” Holloman, who was gunned down after a failed robbery attempt inside his country store located on U.S. 117 in Black Creek on Feb. 13, 1976.

Finch, who is now 75, has spent the past 37 years in prison for a killing he has always maintained he didn’t commit. After a decade-long investigation into Finch’s case, Duke’s Wrongful Conviction Clinic spent Wednesday laying out its case on why Finch’s conviction should be overturned.

A new judge will be now be assigned to the case.

"Ray is disappointed,” said Attorney Jamie Lau, who is part of Finch’s defense team. "We are all very disappointed. We thought Wednesday’s evidence clearly showed the injustices that occurred in Ray’s case. But unfortunately we have to wait for another judge to decide. This is obviously a shock to us.”

Lau said it’s too early to know when the next hearing will be scheduled.

"We will obviously push to have the hearing as quickly as possible,” he said.

Wilson County District Attorney Robert Evans said Thursday as soon as "practical we will work to position the case for rehearing.”

"We remain firm in the belief that the issues raised by the defendant require a full airing in a court of law,” Evans said. "While disappointed with today’s sudden halt to the proceedings, we fully support the judge’s determination as to why it was necessary.”

FBI INVESTIGATION

On Thursday morning, David Rudolf, one of Finch’s attorneys, began questioning former FBI agent Lin Jordan, who lead the investigation into the corruption in the sheriff’s office in the late 70s.

The defense also introduced an FBI report.

Jordan said the investigation began after a madam of a local prostitution house told the FBI that she gave payoffs to the sheriff’s office for protection of her business. Jordan said the FBI worked on the investigation for more than a year, interviewing up to 40 witnesses. He told the court that agents spent a minimum of 3,000 man hours on the federal case.

Rudolf asked Jordan if he could tell the court the general level of corruption.

"Up until that time, it was the most pervasive of law enforcement corruption I’ve ever seen,” he said.

Rudolf asked Jordan as a result of the investigation what he determined about former Chief Deputy Tony Owens’ alleged involvement in the corruption case.

Jordan said according to the information provided by witnesses at the time, it was alleged that Owens was involved in protection of prostitution, illegal gambling and drugs. However, a federal jury acquitted Owens on charges of accepting payoffs to protect a gambling operation and lying to a federal grand jury, which was conducting the investigation of illegal activities in Wilson County.

Former Sheriff W. Robin Pridgen during that time period was found guilty on federal charges of racketeering activity and income tax evasion. Shortly into Jordan’s testimony, Fitch abruptly stopped and asked to see lawyers in his chambers.

Less than 15 minutes later, Fitch announced his decision to the court.

‘HOLD ON’

Finch’s defense team leaned in to explain to him what had happened. Family members appeared distraught, but some said they understood why Fitch made the decision.

"We’re not going to give up,” said Finch’s son, Calvin Jones. "We’re not going to start now.”

Jones said he was looking forward to the hearing being complete and had hoped to bring his father home due to the holidays approaching. Jones was 6 years old when his father went to prison, he said.

"The sooner he comes home the better I will feel,” he said.

Fitch allowed Finch’s family members to see him individually again on Thursday. Jones said he was able to talk and hug his father.

"He said, ‘I knew it. I knew something would come up like this,’” Jones said about their discussion. But Jones said his father told him, "Hold on. We’re going to be all right.”

Duke brought some heavy hitters to Wilson, including a nationally recognized expert in eyewitness memory whose expertise in the subject was used when North Carolina developed a lineup procedure and Eyewitness Identification Act law in 2007 and Raleigh attorney Joseph B. Cheshire V, part of the team that cleared former Duke University lacrosse players, testified as an expert criminal defense attorney. Finch’s defense team includes David Rudolf, who has defended clients including Rae Carruth and Michael Peterson.

Wednesday testimony included Owens, former Wilson County Sheriff’s Office chief deputy and lead investigator in the case, an SBI agent with N.C. State Crime Lab and former district attorney David Williams.

olivia@wilsontimes.com|265-7879
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View Comments:Show/Hide(13 comments)
Jella Ree said...

This town is so small!

Tuesday, November 19, 2013 at 2:02 PM
is this previous comment factual and can be verified? said...

You hit the nail on the head with that one. They aren't even trying to connect this case with the corruption in the sheriff's office. They are just using the corruption case from several years later to descredit Tony Owens (who was acquitted of corrruption) and based on "A Daughters Quest" anything the Sheriff's office ever did. Personally, I'm disgusted at the the Wilson Times collusion in using something totally un-related in an attempt free a cold blooded

Tuesday, November 19, 2013 at 12:14 PM
@Corey Friedman said...

Thank you! I'm tired of people making false claims against people I know or have known and care about with no facts to back up their claims. Someone telling someone "they heard something" is not a fact.
"Libelous and may be legally actionable"
I've been saying this all along. I've consulted with our family lawyer, printed out all these stores and comments and will continue to follow all these stories closely.


Tuesday, November 19, 2013 at 8:23 AM
Corey Friedman said...

We’ve deleted some comments containing factual claims that we cannot independently verify. False claims of fact can be libelous and may be legally actionable. The Times makes no distinction between those who fall on different sides of the ideological spectrum. We do not shield elected officials from criticism, but claims of “corrupt behavior” are serious, and they need to be rooted in verifiable fact.
If you’d like to submit a comment for review or would like to know why a particular comment was not approved, please email me at corey@wilsontimes.com. Thank you for your interest in this story and your participation in our online forum.
Corey Friedman
Online editor | The Wilson Times

Tuesday, November 19, 2013 at 9:04 PM
@ wilson times said...

why do you print some peoples comments and not others. do you have special people you prefer to print comments and some you don't agree with you will not. you seem to print a lot of comments from people against the ward family and not from people who bring up true points about that case and this finch mans case. do you like to protect your local politicians from the public calling them out on their corrupt behavior. I have all ideas im going to cancel my subscription to your paper shortly. you may not care and might like me not commenting on issues of the public.

Monday, November 18, 2013 at 5:58 PM
Student of History said...

I'm sorry, but I am not following you. What two things are you talking about? I was referring only to a potential mistake in arrest/prosecution...

Sunday, November 17, 2013 at 2:32 AM @@student of history said...

Like I have always stated "whats done in the dark will come to light". This man was used to get many others out of their dirt. Who in God's great earth can he harm now at. Let the man live the life he missed out on for 37 years. Its the least they can do. And I believe Wilson Times did an excellent job of covering the story.

Sunday, November 17, 2013 at 11:08 PM @@student of history said...

You hit the nail on the head with that one. They aren't even trying to connect this case with the corruption in the sheriff's office. They are just using the corruption case from several years later to descredit Tony Owens (who was acquitted of corrruption) and based on "A Daughters Quest" anything the Sheriff's office ever did. Personally, I'm disgusted at the the Wilson Times collusion in using something totally un-related in an attempt free a cold blooded murderer.

Friday, November 15, 2013 at 8:14 PM It's me said...

Close family member of mine was in court both days. Yes, we have a personal interest. For anyone who was in court, and has also read everything the Wilson Times has written, it's pretty clear that the paper is eating up whatever slop the Duke lawyers have spooned to them.
Supposedly, there was new evidence that was going to prove he was innocent. There was none.
I had read in the paper that there was a second autopsy that said it was multiple gunshot wounds, and not buckshot. Not a word about that. In fact in court it was stated that there were 9 buckshot pellets removed from Mr. Holloman along with a .38
All they got is the fact that Mr. Finch was wearing a coat in the lineup, and experts that say that this is not the proper way to do a lineup. Ok, I'll grant you that. But, in court on Monday it was stated that the eyewitness had told law enforcement that he recognized the man with the shotgun, he had been in the store the day before buying gas. I hadn't read that before. So, their point is that Finch is in prison because he was wearing a coat in the lineup, not because the witness in fact recognized him from being in the store before.
Get real

Friday, November 15, 2013 at 6:26 PM Oops... said...

"Jordan said the investigation began after a madam of a local prostitution house told the FBI that she gave payoffs to the sheriff’s office for protection of her business. Jordan said the FBI worked on the investigation for more than a year, interviewing up to 40 witnesses. He told the court that agents spent a minimum of 3,000 man hours on the federal case."
.
According to the Wilson Times reporter Stephanie Creech in her series "A Daughters' Quest"; Donald Ward was the one who started the corruption investigation in the WCSD; not the mad'am of a prostitution ring. Which is it WDT?

Friday, November 15, 2013 at 4:36 PM Just wondering said...

So, he was the fall guy?????

Friday, November 15, 2013 at 4:21 PM @student of history said...

The two things have nothing to do with each other, and there has been no evidence to suggest they are. It's just an effort to discredit the lead detective. Personaly, I find it mind boggling that the Duke Justice attorneys went down that road without knowing that Judge Fitch had respresented people involved. They seem incompetent to me.
And I know for a fact that the DA's office was happy about the turn of events. They were all smiles when they came back from the judges chambers and the Duke innoncense attorneys looked like someone had dumped a bucket of cold water on them

Friday, November 15, 2013 at 12:16 PM Student of History said...

Wow - after all these years the corruption in a small eastern NC county still can't be put away. It is sad the number of people that were caught up in this.
Very sad.
At least he was not executed so if this was a miscarriage, it can be corrected.

Friday, November 15, 2013 at 11:48 AM
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