WILSON’S LOCAL PRINT AND DIGITAL COMMUNITY INSTITUTION SINCE 1896

Silver, Virginia currency, Proclamation money used to buy land

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STEPHEN COBB, CONTINUED

“...My wright of the said lands that lies below the road aforesaid is one fifth part of the same that was allotted to the said Patience Cobb widow as aforesaid as a part of her dower as aforesaid exclusive of the said Mill (at the death of the said Patience Cobb), “witnessed by Benjamin Cobb, John Morris and Charles Coleman.

On Aug. 11, 1793, Stephen Cobb of Wayne County sold James Cobb of the same place $400 in silver his interest in “that part was laid off and allotted to John Cobb now deceased orphan of Stephen Cobb Esq. and dec.d which land lies in the County of Edgecombe including Brookins and the High Hill fields, my wright to the said land and appurtenances being two fifths of the same, one fifth by purchase from Benj.a Cobb one of the heirs to the said deceased orphan by deed dated 23rd February 1793....the other fifth part became my property as one of the other of the heirs of the said deceased Orphan and C.a, “witnessed by Benjamin Cobb, John Morris and Charles Coleman.”

On Aug. 8, 1794, Benjamin Cobb of Nash County sold Stephen Cobb of Wayne County for $100 in silver his fifth interest in the dower of Patience Cobb, widow of Stephen Cobb, Esq., in Edgecombe County, witnessed by James Cobb and Charles Coleman. On March 10, 1800, William Barefoot of Edgecombe County sold Stephen Cobb of Wayne County for 15 current money 25 acres north of Contentnea Creek (that fell to me from the death of my father), witnessed by Stephen Barefoot and Jepthah Barefoot.

On March 20, 1800, Stephen Barefoot of Edgecombe County sold Stephen Cobb of Wayne County for 15 current money 25 acres north of Contentnea Creek (legacy from my father’s death), witnessed by John Hardy, William Barefoot and Robert Applewhite.

On May 22, 1800, Stephen Cobb sold Dempsey Barnes of Edgecombe County for $45 in silver money all lands on Tosnot Swamp that will come to Jesse Simmons at the death of his father-in-law Thomas Dixon, witnessed by J. Farmer and Robert Applewhite.

On May 17, 1808, Etheldred and Polly Deberry sold Stephen Cobb of Wayne County for 100 their fifth of 412 acres in Edgecombe County (the right of Deberry’s wife from her mother’s said dower), witnessed by Everard Hall and Charles Coleman.

On Feb. 16, 1808, commissioners William White, Jesse Farmer, Ephraim Daniel, Joseph Barnes and Dawson Vasser divided between Stephen Cobb and Etheldred Deberry the dower of Pateince Cobb, deceased, (412 acres in two tracts from Stephen Cobb Sr., deceased and worth 466.10), of which Stephen Cobb had purchased three-fifths from the other heirs and Deberry had agreed to sell him his fifth interest for 93.6.

On July 21, 1808, Etheldred and Mary “Polly” Deberry sold Stephen Cobb for 95 a tract of 83 acres in Edgecombe County (her share of the division of the “High Hill” tract), witnessed by Jesse Farmer, Esq., Charles Coleman and John Dew, Esq.

On Jan. 10, 1809, Stephen Cobb of Wayne County sold John B. Cobb for 100 the preceding Deberry purchase of 83 acres on Contentnea Creek adjoining James Cobb, William White and the said John B. Cobb, witnessed by John Hardy, James Daniel and Thomas Tomlinson.

WILLIAM BREWER

On June 25, 1763, Nathaniel and Mary Grimes of Johnston County sold William Brewer of Halifax County for 60 sterling money 100 acres west of Richland Creek adjoining Richard Kemp (land bought of Richard Kemp), witnessed by Reuben Ross, John Kemp, and Benjamin Hardy.

On Jan. 15, 1765, Henry and Dinah Kemp of Johnston County sold William Brewer of the same for 35 Virginia currency 100 acres adjoining Richland Creek, Richard Kemp’s old line, and Manuel’s Branch, witnessed by Benjamin Hardy and John Kemp.

On March 5, 1767, Archibald Hamilton, merchant, of Nansemond County, Virginia, sold William Brewer, planter, for 30 Proclamation Money 100 acres north of Richland Creek adjoining Brewer, Ryan, “the high road,” and Ryan’s Spring Branch, witnessed by James Martin and William (W.) Mechleroy.

On June 6, 1767, Thomas Houghton, planter, of Johnston County, sold William Brewer for 50 Proclamation Money 100 acres north of Richland Creek adjoining Richard Kemp and Isaac Bledsoe; also, 175 acres adjoining William Ryan, Kemp, Richland Creek, James Benton, a large branch, and Bledsoe (bought from former Sheriff John McCullers on July 20, 1765); witnessed by Benjamin Hardy, Ann (A.) Spikes and Thomas Huse.

On July 7, 1767, Joseph Montfort of Halifax sold William Brewer for 240 Proclamation Money 150 acres on the Neuse River adjoining Daniel Higdon and Allen (granted to Montfort on June 25, 1762), and the adjoining land bought from Charles Simms “together with one Water Grist Mill, “witnessed by Benjamin Hardy and Joel Lane.

On Oct. 21, 1767, John Mays of Johnston County sold William Brewer for 20 Proclamation Money 200 acres near the Falls of Neuse River adjoining Joel Lain, witnessed by Benjamin Hardy, Jephthah Terrell and James Mays.

On Nov. 28, 1767, William Brewer of Johnston County sold Benjamin Hardy for 50 Proclamation Money 100 acres on Richland creek adjoining Kemp and Isaac Bledsoe; also, 225 acres adjoining William Ryan, William Brewer, Richland Creek, Samuel Benton, a large branch, and Bledsoe (a purchase from Thomas Houghton); witnessed by Francis Wilks and William Warde.

On Feb. 3, 1768, William Brewer sold Philip Jones his interest in the following purchase, witnessed by Thomas Crawford and Philip Pritcherd: On Aug. 6, 1767, Daniel Jackson of Bute County sold William Brewer of Johnston County a gun, slave wench aged 17, 20 cattle “Mark’t with a crop in the right ear and nick under each, “50 hogs” mark’t with a crop in the right ear and two under Nicks in the same and one nick in the left, “ witnessed by Benjamin Brewer sold William Martin of Bute County for 100 Proclamation Money 200 acres near the Falls of Neuse River adjoining Joel Lain and Jacob Bledsoe, witnessed by John Bohannon, Charles Sims, James Terrel and James Mayes.

Hugh Johnston was a Wilson County historian who wrote these historical capsules that previously appeared in The Wilson Daily Times. They are reprinted from a volume of his “Looking Backward” series of books available at the Wilson County Public Library.

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